Roy Gilbert

The effort, part of a national Work From Home Week, reflects a growing interest in what one workplace consultant calls the “fourth industrial revolution.”

Mike Baker has never been a big “work from home guy.” He just doesn’t think he can be as productive if he’s not in his Fort Point office, where he serves as marketing director for the corporate travel platform Lola.com. There are just too many distractions — and comforts — in his East Boston apartment: “I’m in my home, my bed is right there.” Plus he’s had some bad remote-work experiences, like the time he dialed into a meeting and had difficulty hearing, couldn’t tell who was talking, and got hung up on. But with roughly 10 percent of the 100-person Lola.com team working from home on any given day, and a handful of full-time remote employees, Baker and some of his colleagues are working off-site this week in an attempt to better understand what it’s like and gauge the appetite for telework as the company expands. The effort, part of a national Work From Home Week, reflects a growing interest in what one workplace consultant calls the “fourth industrial revolution.” About half the workforce telecommutes at least once a month, according to Global Workplace Analytics and FlexJobs, a job search site, and the number of non-self-employed people in the United States who work remotely at least half the time grew 159 percent between 2005 and 2017, according to the organizations’ analysis of census data. The rise comes as technology improves and job seekers in a historically tight labor market demand more flexibility — and employers realize the benefits […]

Leave a Reply