Roy Gilbert

Young workers are leading the way out of the office

Millennials and Gen Z in flexible jobs are finding time to meditate, exercise and see their family

Millennials and Gen Z in flexible jobs are finding time to meditate, exercise and see their family When Ariel Coleman, 28, quit her last job, as a project manager in the corporate office of a bank, it wasn’t because her new employer offered her a raise, a different role or more seniority. “The work -life balance is just much better,” she said. At her new company, Omfgco , a branding and design firm in Portland, Oregon, everyone works from home on Tuesdays and Thursdays at whichever hours they choose. Coleman can go for a run or walk her dog. At the bank, she says, people judged her for taking all her paid time off. At Omfgco, it’s encouraged, which is why she didn’t mind answering work emails while sitting by the fire on a recent camping trip. “It’s: Get your work done, but don’t worry about when those hours are,” Coleman says. “A client calls me at 8 o’clock at night, and I’m happy to talk to them, because that means the next day at 10am, I can take my dog to the vet. It enables me to make my career more seamless with my life. It makes it feel more like people are human.” Many of her friends have chosen their jobs for similar reasons, she says. “That’s how millennials and Gen Z-ers are playing the game – it’s not about jumping up titles, but moving into better work environments,” she says. Labour commits to 32-hour working week […]

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